Posts filed under ‘Greece’

What’s Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week : April 23, 2012

FOMC meets this weekMortgage markets were mostly unchanged last week, breaking a three-week winning streak. Wall Street grappled with surprising demand on Spain’s debt issuance and a series of weaker-than-expected data points on U.S. housing.

Conforming mortgage rates across Michigan rose slightly according to the weekly Freddie Mac Primary Mortgage Market Survey.

Nationwide, the 30-year fixed rate mortgage rate climbed 2 basis points to 3.90%. This rate is available to homeowners willing to pay 0.8 discount points and a full set of closing costs, where 1 discount point is equal to 1 percent of the borrowed amount.

Prior to last week’s survey, just 0.7 discount points were required.

This week, mortgage rates are expected to be volatile. There is a lot of economic data due for release, the Eurozone’s issues with sovereign debt remain unresolved, and the Federal Open Market Committee gets together for a scheduled, 2-day meeting.

On the data front, the week starts with Tuesday’s Consumer Confidence figures and the government’s New Home Sales report. Both have the power to move mortgage rates. The week then concludes with the Pending Home Sales Index; the GDP release; and a series of Treasury auctions.

With respect to Europe, demand remains strong for debt from Spain, but at much higher rates as compared to several weeks ago. The same is true for Italy. Both nations are feared to be at risk of default on their respective sovereign debt. It’s a similar situation to that which occurred in Greece throughout 2011.

Long-term, lingering concerns for Spain and Italy would likely help keep U.S. mortgage rates suppressed.

And, lastly, the Federal Reserve will make a statement to markets Wednesday afternoon. The Fed is the nation’s central banker and its post-meeting press releases have tremendous influence on bond markets, including those for mortgage-backed bonds.

By extension, therefore, the Federal Reserve’s statement has the power to move mortgage rates in and around Lansing.

If you’re shopping for mortgage rates, it’s as good of a time as any to lock with your lender. Rates have more room to rise than to fall.

April 23, 2012 at 8:47 am Leave a comment

What’s Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week : March 12, 2012

FOMC meeting this weekMortgage markets were mostly unchanged last week despite a series of positive developments. In addition to Greece successfully reaching a deal with its private creditors, the U.S. economy turned out strong reports — most notably with respect to Non-Farm Payrolls.

In February, the U.S. economy added 227,000 new net jobs and the figures from December and January were revised higher by an additional 61,000. It marked the 16th straight month of job gains nationwide.

The Unemployment Rate held unchanged at 8.3%.

Conforming mortgage rates in Michigan improved slightly last week and mortgage rates continue to hover near all-time lows.

According to Freddie Mac, the average 30-year fixed rate mortgage nationwide is now 3.88% for Okemos mortgage applicants willing to pay 0.8 discount points and a full set of closing costs.

1 discount is equal to 1 percent of your loan size.

Freddie Mac also reported the 15-year fixed rate mortgage at its lowest level in history. The average 15-year fixed rate mortgage fell to 3.13% with an accompanying 0.8 discount points. This is more a full percent lower as compared to March 2011.

This week’s big event is the Federal Open Market Committee’s second scheduled meeting of the year. Whenever the FOMC meets, mortgage rates can change in a hurry.

The FOMC is a subcommittee within the Federal Reserve, the U.S. government’s monetary-policy making group. Since 2008, the Federal Reserve has held its benchmark Fed Funds Rate near 0.000%. It’s not expected to raise that rate Tuesday. However, just because the Fed Funds Rate won’t change, that doesn’t mean mortgage rates won’t.

This is because the Fed doesn’t set mortgage rates, but it does influence them. Market will read the Fed’s post-FOMC press release Tuesday for hints of new policy or economic growth. If the statement shows more optimism for the economy than expected, mortgage rates are expected to rise. 

Conversely, if the Fed shows pessimism for the U.S. economy, rates are expected to fall.

Other economic events this week include the releases of Retail Sales, Producer Price Index, and Consumer Price Index; plus three high-profile treasury auctions.

March 12, 2012 at 9:23 am Leave a comment

What’s Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week : February 27, 2012

Existing Home SalesMortgage markets improved in a holiday-shortened week last week, drawing mortgage rates lower throughout East Lansing and nationwide.

Few new economic releases reached the markets, but those that did suggested recovery — especially with respect to housing and employment, two key drivers of the U.S. economy overall.

Mortgage rates tend to rise when on strong data. That’s not what happened last week, however.

First, in housing, the New Home Sales and Existing Home Sales reports each showed strength for December and January. Separate reports show that sales volume is rising nationwide even as the number of available homes for sale fall.

Home Supply is reaching bull market levels, which pressures home prices higher.

And then, in employment, the government’s Initial Jobless Claims report turned up good news, too. The report’s 4-week moving average is now down to its lowest level since 2008, a figure that suggests that U.S. households are getting back to work and staying there.

As rate shoppers in Michigan , don’t expect rates to fall forever.

Last week’s rate improvements were partly because the Greece bailout has yet to be finalized, and partly because concerns about Iran have sparked a mortgage bond flight-to-safety. International demand for U.S.-auctioned bonds was especially high last week and mortgage bonds benefited.

As the situations in Greece and Iran stabilize, therefore, all things equal, mortgage rates should rise.

There are just two key data points set for release this week — the Pending Home Sales Index (Monday) and Personal Income and Outlays (Thursday) — plus two key European votes on the Greece bailout. The Case-Shiller Index will also be released and the FHA is expected to announce new mortgage insurance premiums.

Mortgage rates remain near all-time lows. If you’re still floating a rate, or waiting to refinance, consider moving up your timeframe. It’s a good time to lock your mortgage rate for the long-term.

February 27, 2012 at 10:21 am Leave a comment

What’s Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week : February 21, 2012

Gas prices risingMortgage markets worsened last week as the Eurozone moved closer to a bailout agreement with Greece, and the U.S. economy displayed more signs of growth.

In response, mortgage rates climbed last week.

Rate shoppers should not be surprised that rates ticked north. Since mid-2011, weakness in Greece has helped keep mortgage rates low and the same is true for a weak U.S. economy. Wall Street has sought “safe assets” as protection from risk and that’s driven mortgage rates down.

Now, the safe haven buying that served to anchor low rates appears poised to reverse.

Last month, it was shown, consumer spending rose to record levels and the housing market surpassed analyst expectation again. Homebuilder confidence is now at a 4-year high and Single-Family Housing Starts topped one-half million units for the second straight month.

Conforming mortgage rates in Michigan rose for the first time in a month last week. Unfortunately, few shoppers knew because Freddie Mac’s weekly mortgage rate survey failed to capture the change. The survey deadline was Tuesday. Rates started rising Wednesday morning.

Freddie Mac’s weekly mortgage rate survey put the average 30-year fixed rate mortgage unchanged at 3.87% for borrowers willing to pay 0.8 discount points plus a full set of closing costs.

Rates are higher today.

Beyond Greece and the U.S. economy, inflation is another reason mortgage rates are up. Inflation is the enemy of mortgage rates and, an on annual basis, the core Consumer Price Index registered 2.3% — it’s highest reading since 2008. The Fed expects inflation to ease later this year but if gas prices stay high, the Fed’s forecast may be wrong.

This week is holiday-shortened. Look for Greece to dominate headlines (again) and watch for housing data toward the end of the week. Existing Home Sales is released Wednesday. New Home Sales is released Friday.

For now, mortgage rates remain low. It’s a safe time to lock a long-term rate.

February 21, 2012 at 10:29 am Leave a comment

What’s Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week : February 21, 2012

Gas prices risingMortgage markets worsened last week as the Eurozone moved closer to a bailout agreement with Greece, and the U.S. economy displayed more signs of growth.

In response, mortgage rates climbed last week.

Rate shoppers should not be surprised that rates ticked north. Since mid-2011, weakness in Greece has helped keep mortgage rates low and the same is true for a weak U.S. economy. Wall Street has sought “safe assets” as protection from risk and that’s driven mortgage rates down.

Now, the safe haven buying that served to anchor low rates appears poised to reverse.

Last month, it was shown, consumer spending rose to record levels and the housing market surpassed analyst expectation again. Homebuilder confidence is now at a 4-year high and Single-Family Housing Starts topped one-half million units for the second straight month.

Conforming mortgage rates in Michigan rose for the first time in a month last week. Unfortunately, few shoppers knew because Freddie Mac’s weekly mortgage rate survey failed to capture the change. The survey deadline was Tuesday. Rates started rising Wednesday morning.

Freddie Mac’s weekly mortgage rate survey put the average 30-year fixed rate mortgage unchanged at 3.87% for borrowers willing to pay 0.8 discount points plus a full set of closing costs.

Rates are higher today.

Beyond Greece and the U.S. economy, inflation is another reason mortgage rates are up. Inflation is the enemy of mortgage rates and, an on annual basis, the core Consumer Price Index registered 2.3% — it’s highest reading since 2008. The Fed expects inflation to ease later this year but if gas prices stay high, the Fed’s forecast may be wrong.

This week is holiday-shortened. Look for Greece to dominate headlines (again) and watch for housing data toward the end of the week. Existing Home Sales is released Wednesday. New Home Sales is released Friday.

For now, mortgage rates remain low. It’s a safe time to lock a long-term rate.

February 21, 2012 at 10:26 am Leave a comment

What’s Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week : February 13, 2012

Retail Sales and mortgage ratesMortgage markets were mostly unchanged last week as Greece — once again — was front-of-mind for Wall Street investors. The nation-state is attempting to avoid a debt default, and has been attempting to avoid default since May 2010.

Early in the week, Greece reached a deal with European Union leaders to secure additional financial aid. By Friday, however, the deal was in doubt, as the EU leaders declared that the Greek Parliament would have pass new austerity measures before the aid would be released.

Austerity measures have been unpopular in Greece, giving rise to riots among citizens and resignations among politicians. Markets responded to the potential undoing of the debt deal by seeking safety in bonds — including U.S. mortgage-backed bonds.

The Greek debt default story has helped fuel low mortgage rates in Michigan. Once a final deal is reached, mortgage rates are likely to rise.

For now, though, mortgage rates remain at all-time lows.

According to Freddie Mac’s weekly mortgage rate survey, the average, conforming 30-year fixed mortgage rate held firm at 3.87% last week for mortgage borrowers willing to pay an accompanying 0.8 discount points plus applicable closing costs. 1 discount point is equal to one percent of your loan size.

For borrowers unwilling to pay discount points and/or closing costs, average mortgage rates are higher.

This week, data returns to the U.S. economic calendar.

Greece will still be in play, but the health of the U.S. economy will determine in which direction mortgage rates will go. There are two inflation reports due — the Consumer Price Index and the Producer Price Index.

The former is a “cost of living” indicator for U.S. households; the latter measures the same for business. Inflation is bad for mortgage rates so if either report comes in unexpectedly high, mortgage rates are likely to rise.

The same is true for Tuesday’s Retail Sales report.

Retail Sales account for close to 70% of total U.S. economic activity. An unexpectedly strong Retail Sales figure will suggest that the domestic economy is improving and that, too, would pressure mortgage rates up.

If you’re shopping for a mortgage, or floating one with your lender, consider locking in this week. Mortgage rates don’t have much room to fall and there’s much room to rise.

February 13, 2012 at 10:29 am Leave a comment

What’s Ahead For Mortgage Rates This Week : February 13, 2012

Retail Sales and mortgage ratesMortgage markets were mostly unchanged last week as Greece — once again — was front-of-mind for Wall Street investors. The nation-state is attempting to avoid a debt default, and has been attempting to avoid default since May 2010.

Early in the week, Greece reached a deal with European Union leaders to secure additional financial aid. By Friday, however, the deal was in doubt, as the EU leaders declared that the Greek Parliament would have pass new austerity measures before the aid would be released.

Austerity measures have been unpopular in Greece, giving rise to riots among citizens and resignations among politicians. Markets responded to the potential undoing of the debt deal by seeking safety in bonds — including U.S. mortgage-backed bonds.

The Greek debt default story has helped fuel low mortgage rates in Michigan. Once a final deal is reached, mortgage rates are likely to rise.

For now, though, mortgage rates remain at all-time lows.

According to Freddie Mac’s weekly mortgage rate survey, the average, conforming 30-year fixed mortgage rate held firm at 3.87% last week for mortgage borrowers willing to pay an accompanying 0.8 discount points plus applicable closing costs. 1 discount point is equal to one percent of your loan size.

For borrowers unwilling to pay discount points and/or closing costs, average mortgage rates are higher.

This week, data returns to the U.S. economic calendar.

Greece will still be in play, but the health of the U.S. economy will determine in which direction mortgage rates will go. There are two inflation reports due — the Consumer Price Index and the Producer Price Index.

The former is a “cost of living” indicator for U.S. households; the latter measures the same for business. Inflation is bad for mortgage rates so if either report comes in unexpectedly high, mortgage rates are likely to rise.

The same is true for Tuesday’s Retail Sales report.

Retail Sales account for close to 70% of total U.S. economic activity. An unexpectedly strong Retail Sales figure will suggest that the domestic economy is improving and that, too, would pressure mortgage rates up.

If you’re shopping for a mortgage, or floating one with your lender, consider locking in this week. Mortgage rates don’t have much room to fall and there’s much room to rise.

February 13, 2012 at 10:19 am Leave a comment

Older Posts


Don Grimes

Click On Logo For More Info

Don Grimes
"Your Residential Mortgage Specialists"
Senior Mortgage Loan Officer
NMLS: #130686

Michigan Mutual, Inc
Office: (517) 507-0151
Toll Free: (800) 521-1642
Mobile: (517) 927-8110
don@DonGrimes.com
www.DonGrimes.com

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,112 other followers